Academics

Past tenses overview

Past tenses overview

The past simple refers to a single, completed action in the past.

“Used to” and “would”

“Used to” and “would”

When talking about habits or states in the past, “used to” or “would” are often...

The past perfect continuous

The past perfect continuous

English uses the past perfect continuous with the past simple to talk about an activity...

The past perfect simple

The past perfect simple

English uses the past perfect simple with the past simple to talk about two or more...

The present perfect continuous

The present perfect continuous

The present perfect continuous is used to talk about a continuing activity in the...

The past continuous

The past continuous

The past continuous is used in English to talk about actions or events that were...

Past simple questions

Past simple questions

Questions in the past simple are formed using “did.” For past simple questions with...

The past simple negative

The past simple negative

The past simple negative is used to talk about things that did not happen in the...

Past simple

Past simple

The past simple is used to talk about completed actions that happened at a fixed...

Imperatives

Imperatives

Imperatives are used to give commands or to make requests. They can also be used...

Present tenses overview

Present tenses overview

The present simple is used to talk about permanent situations, regular occurrences,...

The present continuous negative

The present continuous negative

To make the negative of the present continuous, add “not” after “be.”

Questions in the present continuous

Questions in the present continuous

To ask questions in the present continuous, swap the subject and the form of “be.”...

The present continuous (Grammar) | Hamaraguru

The present continuous (Grammar) | Hamaraguru

The present continuous is used to talk about continued actions that are happening...

Present simple questions

Present simple questions

Questions in the present simple with “be” are formed by swapping the verb and subject....

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